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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
south asia correspondent julie mccarthy, who's reporting this story from delhi. jns julie, there are tens of thousands of rapes in end yabs, there are 40,000 rape cases currently-- currently in the courts. why has this case caught the national imagination? >> wbltion i think what cause the imagination of the people was this horrendous attack on this young woman that is 23-year-old girl who was-- who is at the heart of this upheaval in india. after the shock subsided there was anger and it poured out into the streets. so you had a very graphic symbol around which people rallied. and the protests in many ways were spontaneous. they were driven by the it revolution that is india. social media played a huge role in assembling people, getting out the message, what were they doing, where were they doing it. and prot testers were demanding sus 'tis for this young woman who they said was gang raped on a moving bus that passed through police check pointses that assault was taking place. so there was dismay of the police who had long been criticized on their infectioniveness on hand
south asia correspondent julie mccarthy, who's reporting this story from delhi. jns julie there are tens of thousands of rapes in end yabs, there are 40,000 rape cases currently-- currently in the courts. why has this case caught the national imagination? >> wbltion i think what cause the imagination of the people was this horrendous attack on this young woman that is 23-year-old girl who was-- who is at the heart of this upheaval in india. after the shock subsided there was anger and it poured out into the streets. so you had a very graphic symbol around which people rallied. and the protests in many ways were spontaneous. they were driven by the it revolution that is india. social media played a huge role in assembling people, getting out the message, what were they doing, where were they doing it. and prot testers were demanding sus 'tis for this young woman who they said was gang raped on a moving bus that passed through police check pointses that assault was taking place. so there was dismay of the police who had long been criticized on their infectioniveness on handling violent cri
care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing
an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces. itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today at the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statemen
. >>> here it was on its final mission in july of last year. watch. >> all three engines up and burning. 2, 1, 0, and lift off. the final lift off of atlantis on the shoulders of the space shuttle. >> now the retired space shuttle will still be in the air, but not as high. elevated off the ground in its permanent home at kennedy space center. the new museum is set to open, but we're getting a sneak preview from john zarrella. john, i can tell by the hard hat and vest that it's still being bui built. a lot of work to be done. >> reporter: yeah, victor, this is an active construction site we're at. this is the museum facility. 90,000 square feet, $100 million project. when atlantis was towed over here, one of the walls was left off to get the vehicle in. . so everybody is asking, where's atlantis? let's take a look. that's it. in shrink wrap. 16,000 square feet of shrink wrap has been used to protect it it from debris that might fall as they are literally building this entire facility around the shuttle atlantis. and i've got the director of development here with me. i wanted to ask you. you ha
the fiscal cliff. the dow lost 158 points, it is currently a five day losing streak in its longest since july. the nasdaq reported 25 points. >> banks rack up a record to $10.7 billion in fines in 2012. that includes what the banks paid to u.s. and state of 40's-but it does not include the billions more paid to european regulators. most of the fines were related to improper mortgage practices. >> making interstate phone calls could soon get cheaper. for prison inmates. prison call systems are different than normal pay phones. a typical 50 minute conversation current cost an average of $16. that is largely due to fees that call providers are allowed to charge prisoners in some states. here in new york, where fees are banned, rates can go as low as 5¢ a minute. but in places like colorado, inmates did charge almost 90¢ a minute. the sec is planning to open the public comment about reducing rates nationwide. >> the u.s. population is said to hit 350 million by the new year's day. it has an increase of less than 1 percent since april 2010, which was the last time the population snapshot was tak
while broadening the base. david: all right. now, that was in july of 2011 and then a couple of week-- a couple of months later came out with the budget, saying the tax system should be simplified and work for all americans with lower rates and brackets. the president has come out time and again saying we shouldn't raise any kind of rates. is anybody calling him on that? >> well, a lot of republicans are wondering what's different now? we still have a sluggish economy, why the change in position? , but the president was out on the campaign trail, time and time again saying individuals and families specifically making over $250,000 a year should be-- should get tax increases so he's sticking to that position, like i mentioned before, the white house seems to be signaling that they would move in the direction of 400,000, those making over 400,000 increases there which may be something that congress could agree on and get through. but again, we're going to have the conservative wave in the republican house saying no increases, so, boehner's going to be in in a position do i get democrat
the in"under god" were added to the pledge of allegiance, it he proclaimed the fourth of july and national day of prayer. on that day, eisenhower fished in the morning, both in the afternoon, and played bridge in the evening. there were prayers -- perhaps when the chief executive faced a daunting putt. this was not his first foray into the darkened ground of the relationship between religion and american politics. three days before christmas in 1952, president elect ike made a speech in which she said "our form of government has no sense unless it is founded in the deeply felt religious faith and i do not care what it is." he received a much ridicule from his cultured despise years. his professed indifference to the major of the religious faith. it is the first part of the statement that deserves continuing attention. certainly many americans, perhaps the majority of them, agreed that democracy or at least our democracy, which is based on a belief in natural rights, presupposes religious faith. people believe this that all people are endowed by their creator with certain unali
fell this month to the lowest point since july. and wall street gave ground today on worries about the lack of a budget deal in washington. the dow jones industrial average lost almost 121 points to close near 13,190. the nasdaq fell 29 points to close at 3,021. for the week, the dow gained about half a percent; the nasdaq rose 1.7%. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we return to the aftermath of the shootings in newtown, connecticut, a week ago today. ray suarez begins our coverage of the latest developments. >> suarez: a cold rain fell this morning in newtown, connecticut, as townspeople and officials gathered at city hall for a moment of silence. at 9:30, a bell rang 26 times, once for each of the 20 children and six adults killed one week ago at sandy hook elementary school. mourners also gathered again at funerals and at makeshift memorials. >> i feel as though the first few days after this happened was really a feeling of numbness and shock. but now that's lifting a little bit and the reality is setting in, and it's very, very pain
government. this past july u.s. attorney melinda hague filed forfeiture action against them. that means that the buildings could be seized dispensary shut down. it's all part of ongoing federal crackdown on pot in california. >> one of the reasons we are making these announcements today to try to put to rest the notion that large marijuana businesses can shelter themselves under state law and operate without fear of federal enforcement. >> henry, the lead attorney for harbor side, says in the past year hundreds of california dispensaries have been shut down. >> up until now every time the federal government has attempted to close down a dispensary through forfeiture action they have closed their doors and moved on. i suspect that that's what they thought was going to happen with harbor side but they got a big surprise. >> shortly after they received the notice, harbor side announced they would contest the case. and in october they received an unlikely ally, the city of oakland. city own barbara parker filed suited against the federal government. parker says oakland has already heavily
what you're doing. >> this was not a happy afternoon. this was fourth of july weekend a couple of years ago. .. >> i said, what are you talking about? i didn't know how concrete consultants can get sometimes. he said when you speak at a college campus on the people really like speakers, the three months, six months, nine months or 12 months later, they are not really taking action. and i said, you know, this does not sound great. that he doesn't -- instead, actually, i have a theory about this, and i said, what is your theory? he said my theory is it's your fault. [laughter] so i kind of wish i hadn't asked that question. he said the problem, eboo patel, is when you talk about interfaith cooperation from you talk about many different things. people can't and won't do a hundred different things. you have to be able to articulate an aspirational vision of this and we did people take action. and not measure your effectiveness by the applause after speeches. effectiveness is interfaith cooperation and how many people are becoming interfaith leaders, starting their own interfaith programs on
resource for anyone looking to become more familiar with how government works and capitol hill. >> julie watches c-span on verizon, c-span created by america's cable companies in 1979 brought as a public service by your television provider. [applause] >> justice anthony kennedy spoke at the heritage some asian as a part of a lecture series called preserve the constitution. he said it's the duty of every american to fulfill the constitution. he was introduced by the former attorney general's. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and gentlemen. it's great for me to be able to join john and welcome you here to this lecture. this is the fifth annual occasion on which we have had this lecture and i'm sure you all know the heritage foundation vision is to build an america where freedom, opportunity, prosperity and civil society flourished. to help achieve this, the center for legal and judicial studies launched the preserve the constitution series, which is an annual lecture series to inform and educate citizens on topics related to the constitution and the rule of law. the preserved constitution s
. in court document, the 21-year-old told a judge her parents, julie and david, frequently drove from their home in kansas to her campus in ohio unannounced to check up on her. they told her and college officials she had mental problems and they could try to have her evaluated. in the filings, she said her parents traveled to cincinnati, showed up at my university and made threats to my musical theatre department. and added, "they also improperly monitored my phone and computer with tracking software." it is an unusual case, experts say, that goes beyond what's known as the helicopter and overprotective parent. >> the helicopter parent is overly involved maybe, intrusive. but they understand their child is a separate human being. the toxic parent doesn't understand that. they're overly suffocating. they view their child as an object. >> reporter: "the cincinnati ending requirer" reported the prestigious music program offered aubrey a scholarship for her final year. when her parents stopped paying tuition and wanted their daughter to pay them back for her first three years at the unive
from julie. why can't the government run the country the way i run my household? i pay my bills on time and i have a budget. that's a tweet. >> eric: stop being dems and republicans, citizens of one country. that's a fantastically accurate treat. it's both sides pointing the finger. kind of laughing, going back to the districts, they're all making their 175 grand a year, they're spending 124 days on vacation. the cadillac insurance policy. >> juliet: let's go to other headlines. russian president putin is trying to make a political point at the expense of orphans. just a short time ago, putin signed a bill that bans americans from adopting russian children. it's retaliation for a u.s. law cracking down on russian human rights violators here in the united states. one american family in the process of adopting is now left in limbo. >> these children are not available to international adoption until after they've been on a domestic registry for at least eight months. now, in our son's case, 22 families, russian families, came to see him and rejected him because of his blood line. >> juliet
and put our initial application in april and then it was a lot of back-and-forth. and until july when they finally said that they would give us access to. but then we didn't get access to it and we still haven't received access to it. now in all fairness, at bat -- inhofe late august we were sued by the aclu that we didn't prevent us from being a will to get access to the database what we would be able to do with it after that point and we haven't received access to the database. the discussions have just basically gone bats appointing because we are trying to do the right thing. we don't want to accuse somebody that is assisting the united states that they are not able to vote and they are not a citizen. that same database gives us time and information on individual citizenship and would allow us to make sure to have the 3,500 eda two that we would be able to find out that who is a citizen and who isn't. we know what least six of those individuals were not citizens because the department of investigation did find that out through the investigative work that takes a lot of time we wou
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)